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History | Student News

Erin Hvizdak Presents Paper

Erin Hvizdak is presenting her paper, “Universalizing Solitude: Parisian Commemoration of a Maroon Woman’s Resistance,” at the meeting of the Western Society for French History in Victoria, BC, November 5, 2022. This paper grew out of her research in History 571 last spring, and developed further over the summer with her travel to Paris.

Kyley Canion-Brewer Presents Paper

Kyley Canion-Brewer will present her paper, “What Remains? Decolonization in the History of the AfricaMuseum (1897 – 2020),” based on her M.A. thesis with Dr. Sun, at the French Colonial Historical Society annual meeting in Charleston, South Carolina, on May 14, 2022.

Victor Moore Presents at University of Maryland History Graduate Student Association Annual Conference

MA student Victor Moore presented “A Historiographical Examination of the Causes of Trinidad and Tobago’s Black Power Revolution of 1970″ at the 16th Annual Conference of the University of Maryland History Graduate Student Association, with the theme this year of “Conflict, Protest, Insurrection, Coup.” 
This presentation was via Zoom on Friday, March 18th .

Kyley Canion-Brewer to Present at Nineteenth Century Studies Association Conference

MA student Kyley Canion-Brewer will be participating in the 2021 Graduate Caucus Roundtable “Rethinking Research in the Age of Digital Humanities” for the 2022 Nineteenth Century Studies Association Conference. For this conference she will be presenting her digital project that maps potential points of restitution in the Royal Museum of Central Africa in Brussels.

The AfricaMuseum underwent a 5-year remodel between 2013 and 2018 wherein it claimed to ‘decolonize’ itself in regards to both its community role and it’s collection. One consequence of this remodel is a focus on the provenance, or origin, of collection artifacts.

The digital ‘provenance’ tour operates through QR scanning to allow patrons to (optionally) investigate the origins of specific pieces across the colonial and post-colonial exhibits, however, the museum itself in a public setting continues to maintain the provenance of their collections are unknown and thus do not require the much called for restitution of religious and cultural artifacts back to the Congo.

This digital project is a website with an interactive map that seeks to place these artifacts in conversation with BOTH the museum and their place of origin (DRC). The goal of this is to restructure the information the museum is sharing across platforms to help visitors to investigate for themselves the colonial position that the AfricaMuseum still very much occupies to this day.

Congratulations Kyley!