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History | History Events

WSU-TriCities Panel “The Holocaust, Neo-Nazism, and White Supremacy”

Bob Bauman, lead liaison with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Center for Arts and Humanities, organized a panel being given Thursday, October 7th from 4:30pm-5:45pm at WSU-TriCities on “The Holocaust, Neo-Nazism, and White Supremacy.”

It will be available on Zoom (registration link below) and available afterward on the WSUTC YouTube channel.

The Holocaust, Neo-Nazism, and White Supremacy | Events | Washington State University (wsu.edu)

Conversation with Peter Boag – “Crossing Boundaries: Trans History, Then and Now”

Crossing Boundaries: Trans History, Then and Now, on October 14th at 7:00 PM.

Join via Zoom for this conversation about the history of transgender people and how westward migration provided opportunities for self-expression and fulfillment. Viewers will have the chance to submit questions to the panel during the Q&A portion of the program.

 Advance registration is required to get the Zoom link. Register here.

Get details about the Crossing Boundaries exhibition and learn more about Dr. Boag here.

Dr. Noriko Kawamura presents in the Malcolm Renfrew Interdisciplinary Colloquium

To Transnationalize War Memory
for Peace and Kyosei: Reconciliation
of Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima

Abstract

How we remember World War II in the Pacific is clearly divided by national boundaries. The contrast between how Americans and Japanese remember Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor and the U.S. use of the atomic bombs over Hiroshima and Nagasaki clearly demonstrates this point. This divide is hard to erase in a world that consists of nation-states, but this talk will explore how we may be able to make conscious efforts to build bridges across national boundaries that exist in war memories by learning the other side’s experiences and understanding the common humanity beyond nation-states.

This talk was originally planned as part of the Hiroshima exhibit organized by the University of Idaho Library for the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II. The exhibit depicts the exchange of gifts between Hiroshima University and the University of Idaho to share their hopes and commitments to humanity and world peace.

Biography
Noriko Kawamura is the Arnold M. and Atsuko Craft Professor in the Department of History in Washington State University in Pullman. She earned a B.A. from Keio University in Tokyo, Japan, and her M.A. and Ph.D. in History from the University of Washington in Seattle. She first taught at the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Virginia, and joined WSU’s History Department in 1992.

Kawamura’s research focuses on the history of war, peace, and diplomacy in the Pacific World. She teaches the history of U.S. foreign relations, U.S. military history, World War II in the Pacific, and the Cold War. Her publications include Emperor Hirohito and the Pacific War (University of Washington Press, 2015), Turbulence in the Pacific: Japanese–U.S. Relations during World War I (Praeger, 2000), and Building New Pathways to Peace (University of Washington Press, 2011). She is currently writing a book about Emperor Hirohito’s Cold War, under contract with the University of Washington Press.

Exhibit
A special collection donated to the University of Idaho by Hiroshima University in Japan is on display on the second floor of the U of I Library.  In the early 1950s, as Hiroshima University began to rebuild from the effects of the atomic bomb, the university reached out around the world to ask for book donations. U of I responded with a book and gift of $5 to purchase a tree.

In 2011, U of I received a gift from students at Hiroshima University to recognize the donation. The box included a set of manga about the bomb, copies of the correspondence from 1951-1952, and roof tiles that had been blown off of a local building during the bomb blast and had been dredged off the floor of the Hiroshima River.  See a video tour of the exhibit, “Growing from Ground Zero

The library exhibit and Prof. Kawamura’s talk are co-sponsored by the Borah Foundation and the Martin Institute at the University of Idaho. Sign up for this event at the link here.

“Implications of COVID-19 for Atrocity Prevention”

The Seattle Holocaust Center for Humanity will be hosting a noon-hour virtual presentation via Zoom and Facebook Live by a major genocide expert, Dr. James Waller. While COVID-19’s impact continues on a global scale – economically, socially, politically, and existentially – it will be particularly felt in deeply divided, fragile, conflict-prone, or at-risk societies.  In such societies, it is absolutely vital that policy measures be taken for preventive action before risk escalates to the point of mass atrocity.  This presentation will review some of those pressure points related to governance, economic conditions, and social fragmentation.  The pandemic, and its potential to serve as a trigger for mass violence, makes our shared work of atrocity prevention more urgent than ever.

https://holocaustcenterseattle.org/programs-events/virtual-lunch-and-learn-series