Skip to main content Skip to navigation
History | Humanities

Brian Stack publishes article in the Journal of the History of Sexuality

PhD candidate Brian Stack has published an article in the Journal of the History of Sexuality. The May 2019, volume 28, opens with Stack’s work titled, “From Sodomists to Citizens: Same Sex Sexuality and the Progressive Era Washington State Reformatory.”

Use your WSU Libraries access provided to faculty, staff, and students to read the article on Project Muse, here!

 

Ryan Booth wins Fullbright!

Congratulations to doctoral student Ryan W. Booth who has received a Fulbright U.S. Student award to spend nine months in India exploring socio-cultural characteristics attributed to indigenous soldiers during the British Raj up to a century ago.

His work adds an international element to his dissertation, and may well lead to a new global thread of research in the area of military history.

Booth is WSU’s 62nd student to receive a Fulbright since 1949, the ninth from the history discipline, and the fifth to study or teach in India; the next-most-recent studied there in 1965.

Read the Indian Country Today article in full here!

RCI George & Bernadine Converse Lecture with Dr. Breland-Noble

“AAKOMA: Understanding Global-Historical Context and Complexity of Mental Health & Depression Disparities in Black Youth”

While the prevalence of depression rates varies little across racial groups of teens, Black (African American, Caribbean Black, Black African and Black Latinx) youth face significant disparities in accessing state of the art care. This presentation will illuminate the underlying historical and globally applicable psychological barriers to depression treatment engagement and research participation cited by Black youth, families and communities.

Wednesday, March 20, 2019 at 7 PM – 9 PM
CUB Sr. Ballroom  220

A.P Chastain’s book under contract with Univ. of Pittsburgh Press

Assistant Professor Andra Chastain recently announced that Itineraries of Expertise: Science, Technology, and the Environment in Latin America’s Long Cold War, is now under contract with the University of Pittsburgh Press, in their Intersections series.  Andra is a co-editor, with Timothy Lorek, and has a chapter in the volume as well. Congratulations!

Reframing Landscapes: Digital Practices and Place-based Learning

Landscapes are persistent and dynamic characters in our lives, yet they often go unexamined. We may easily take for granted the crisscrossed and subdivided roadways, zoning ordinances, waterways, and cultural assumptions that give shape to our online maps and automated GPS systems. At the heart of WSU’s land grant mission is the idea that places matter, that they have a history, that our relationships to places are deeply connected to the people with whom we share them and the histories that animate them. But how can we better make places a conscious factor in our scholarship and research, our decision-making, our teaching, and our community-building efforts that extend beyond the University landscapes? How can we reframe landscapes that are indelibly marked by colonial and violent histories? The 2019 Center for Digital Scholarship and Curation’s Spring Symposium will highlight projects both external and internal to WSU that seek to reframe assumed narratives, representations, and relationships to and with place, new digital projects and techniques, and innovative pedagogical practices with an eye toward collaborations and meaningful partnerships.

Sponsors:

Center for Digital Scholarship and Curation, WSU Libraries, WSU English Department, WSU History Department, WSU College of Education, WSU Native Programs, Pettyjohn Memorial Fund, WSU Office of the Provost.

 

Monday, March 4th, 10:00am-3:00pm

CUB Junior Ballroom

&

Tuesday, March 5th

Center for Digital Scholarship and Curation, 4th Floor, Holland Library

Dr. Boag’s talk, “Alternative Masculinities in the ‘Old West’: Some Stories of Subversion, Resistance, and Acceptance” for LCHS

The Latah County Historical Society is hosting a series of talks exploring some of the myths that are so common about the American West. The series begins on Tuesday, February 19 with WSU History Department professor and Columbia Chair in the History of the American West, Dr. Peter Boag. Dr. Boag’s talk, “Alternative Masculinities in the ‘Old West’: Some Stories of Subversion, Resistance, and Acceptance” shares stories of individuals whose truths subvert common wisdom about the region’s gender stereotypes, whose lives of resistance to societal norms question masculinity and femininity, and whose oft-times acceptance by their communities flies in the face of stereotypes, prejudices, and violence against difference that plagues the region to this day.
The public is invited to join in for this free event on Tuesday, February 19 at 6 p.m. in the Arts Workshop at the 1912 Center (412 East 3rd St, Moscow). Additional dates in the series are March 26, “American Indian Education and Contested Power” with Philip Stevens, and April 16, “Women’s Work in the West” with Katrina Eichner.
For more information, please contact lchslibrary@latah.id.us or call (208) 882-1004.
Washington State University